25 November 2019 ~ 0 Comments

How To Secure Toy & Game Distribution Across Europe

In the last article in this series we looked at how to secure distribution into North America. This time we’re looking at Europe.

The start point in looking at Europe is that despite the existence of the European Union (which makes things much easier for trading across the continent), you are looking at more than 40 countries, each with it’s own culture, history, retail market and regulatory framework. Europe adds up to roughly around the same market value as the U.S.A., but that large market comes in many bits and pieces in Europe!

The three biggest markets (by quite a long way) are the UK, France & Germany. Depending on which published figures you believe, these 3 markets make up around 50% (give or take a bit) of the European toy market.

Followers of the ’80-20′ rule could be forgiven for thinking they will just focus on these 3 markets & take 50% of the potential opportunity. The challenge though is that these 3 markets alone are actually really quite different from each other, and so it isn’t always possible to use the same strategy in all three:

UK Toy & Games Market: The UK is one of the most license driven toy markets. Movie related toys have always been a big thing, as are ‘TV’ properties and even YouTube content/personality licenses these days. In distribution terms, the market has a strong mass market channel with generalist retailers like Argos & grocers like Tesco, Asda & Sainsburys having good market share. Online has been strong for a long time in the UK, with Amazon leading the market. The toy specialist retail channel in the UK is also strong, with Smyths & The Entertainer achieving ongoing success, which looks set to continue as they take advantage of the gap left in the market by the disappearance of Toys R Us from the UK market. The ‘independent’ toy retail sector in the UK is comparatively small, which means that 5 or 6 retailers can still drive the majority of the opportunity, so most companies approach the UK market either via distributors, sales agents or via setting up their own subsidiary & sales team.

Germany Toy & Games Market – the German toy & games market is quite different from the UK. Overall it is far less license driven, with an emphasis on higher quality components/materials i.e. overall less plastic! And if the toy is still plastic it is more likely to be of higher quality plastic. The parenting culture is strong and German parents tend to be very responsible & interested in the development of their children, especially versus the U.K. Therefore product categories such as board games, construction toys, learning toys are all comparatively strong in Germany. The retail market in Germany is quite fragmented, with thousands of independent toy stores, and a number of retail chains who are important but not dominant players. Germany has long been one of the most internet savvy markets in Europe, as such online channels including Amazon (of course!) are strong. Germany would be a harder market to set up your own distribution due to the fragmented market & store by store of some key retailers/channels in Germany. Therefore distributors would normally be the chosen path to market in Germany.

France Toy & Games Market – France is a strong toy market, but with some distinct local differences. For instance, France has a content production ecosystem of its own, along with long standing comic culture which means that while licensed toys are fairly strong in France, some are based on licenses from France’s own entertainment content. The retail market has 3 key channels: hypermarkets or ‘hypermarch√©’ inc. Carrefour, Auchan & Leclerc. These retail behemoths have less market share now than in the past but they are still significant. They are known for running massive toy promotions in the last part of the year. While the toy ranges may be small throughout Q1-Q3, they tend to expand significantly in Q4 with aggressive pricing to match. The toy specialist retail channel in France is long established but has had some issues in the past few years as key players ran into financial difficulty. Again the online channel is established in France and as elsewhere is an increasingly significant contributor to the market. France has some strong distributors, as well as the usual network of sales agents/reps. Setting up your own subsidiary can be risky as hiring staff in France is comparatively easy, but firing staff in France is difficult and costly because of local employment laws.

CONCLUSION – in summary, Europe represents a significant opportunity for toy & game companies to expand their distribution. Bear in mind though that despite the helpful presence of the European Union, it is not one uniform market place. Product culture varies from market to market, as does the retail landscape. A winning strategy for European toy & games distribution is to allow for local differences in your plans!

If you are interested in selling into European toy & game markets we offer a Consultancy service to toy and board game companies across the world (past clients have come from countries as diverse as the USA, Australia, India, China, Bulgaria, Korea etc). Our brand, product and export sales management service allows us to get deep underneath the skin of toy companies and to help them sell more into North America & elsewhere both via effective selling using our extensive toy industry connections, but also by helping them to correctly align their brands and products to the market. We offer this service with a limited capacity with a maximum of 5 spaces at any one time. At the time of writing, we have only 1 space left heading into toy fair season. To find out more about working with us on this service & to get our help to grow your business please just drop us a line or visit here for more details: www.KidsBrandInsight.com/services/

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